Blue Monarch Group

The Science Behind the Stories: How to Use Science for Better Storytelling

alt=''heart shaped pages of a book on top of a table with colorful pencils and a blackboard in the background''

The world of digital media is rediscovering the power of storytelling. From Snapchat to Instagram and Facebook Live, digital content creators are turning to video as a way to build trust with their audiences and drive engagement. The power of storytelling extends beyond video, however, and extends into other content types such as blog posts. We are living in the age of information overload. On average, adults consume about 33 gigabytes of information a day. The abundance of content has made it harder than ever for people to stand out – especially if you’re trying to target millennials or other digital natives. In such an oversaturated market, storytellers have to work twice as hard to make sure that their audience remembers them. Research shows that stories trigger parts of our brains that other mediums can’t reach. They also help us retain information better and give us insight into complex issues in an accessible way. But how do you create a story that resonates with your readers? Here are some tips on how you can use science for better storytelling:

Define your audience and why they care

One of the first steps in developing a story is to understand your audience – who they are and what they want. Conduct some research to find out what your readers care about, what their pain points are, and what they want to get out of their digital experience. Understanding your audience will help you identify the most important issues at play in their lives and what they hope the story will do for them. It will also make it easier to identify a unique angle for your story. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: What does my audience care about? What are their goals and pain points? How can I use my story to help them?

Build trust with qualitative research before you jump in

Once you understand your audience, the next step is to gain trust from them. Trust is one of the most important parts of storytelling: it’s the foundation that lets your audience hear your story and let you guide them through it. Creating a story without developing trust with your audience will limit its reach and impact. However, it’s important to note that you can’t just jump into storytelling without building trust first. You have to lay the groundwork and make sure that you have a strong foundation to build off of. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: How can I build trust with my audience before telling my story?

Focus on one core idea when telling a story

As we discussed, stories have the power to engage and connect people on a psychological level. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: What is the core idea that my story is trying to communicate?

Show, don’t just tell

As we discussed, stories have the power to engage and connect people on a psychological level. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: How can I help my audience to see what I’m trying to communicate? What visuals can I use to help people engage with the story?

Use visuals to reinforce your point

Stories have the power to engage and connect people on a psychological level. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: What visuals can I use to help people connect with my story? What visuals can I use to reinforce my message? What visuals can I use to help people see what I’m trying to communicate?

Be human: Talk to people, not demographics

Stories have the power to engage and connect people on a psychological level. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: What groups of people can I talk to when developing my story?

Summing up

Stories have the power to engage and connect people on a psychological level. When developing a story, try to ask yourself: What story do I want to tell? How does this story help my audience? What does this story do for my audience? When developing a story, what elements should you keep in mind? Remember the importance of empathy, keeping it brief, and making it relatable. Storytelling isn’t easy – but with the right approach, you can make it an incredibly powerful tool to engage your readers and help them learn from your content.

Butterfly Effect

Sign up for the insights. Keep you with the times!

%d bloggers like this: